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Results Contest : Waterfalls

by Yvette Depaepe
Published the 20st of January 2021
 

Waterfalls are one of nature's wonders.  Shooting them is pretty challenging.  Using a long shutter speed results in a smooth silky movement of the water. Using a short shutter speed can freeze their incredible power.  The submissions to this contest all show their immeasurable and powerful beauty. 
Enjoy the gallery of 10 best images.

The winners with the most votes are:

1st place: Siarhei Mikhaliuk  
2nd place: Birgitta Berglund  
3rd place: Pedro Uranga 

Congratulations to the winners and honourable mentions and thanks to all the participants
in the contest
'Waterfalls'.

 

'Cars in the spotlights' is the currently running contest.
Cars were ever beloved things.  Taking pictures from cars is such an interesting thing on it's own. It's like science. There is a large range of opportunities to shoot cars: Cars in motion, cars in daylight, cars at night or car details.

This contest will end at midnight on Sunday the 31st of January 2021.
The sooner you upload your submission the more chance you have to gather the most votes.
If you haven't uploaded your photo yet, click here

Good luck to all the participants...

 

1st place: by Siarhei Mikhaliuk 

 

 

     
2nd place: by Birgitta Berglund

 

 


3rd place: Pedro Uranga 

 

 

HONOURABLE  MENTIONS

 


 by MJoão Ferreira

 

 


by Uschi Hermann

 

 


by Fred Zhang

 

 


by Stefan Zuser

 

 


by Markus Auerbach

 

 


by Piet Haaksma

 

 


by Giuseppe Satriani 

Write
Thanks for publishing and for the congratulations. For me, it has been the first time in the "top-ten" and I am very proud and happy for this! Congratulations to all the participants!!!
Congrats to the photographers of this beautiful images ... Superb!!
Congratulations to the winners and honourable mentions and thanks to all the participants. If you want to see these results in large display on white background, check out this link: https://gamma.1x.com/magazine/permalink/9111. Cheers, Yvette
Roxana Labagnara: Featured 1x Photographer

by Yvette Depaepe
Published the 18th January 2021 

 
Roxana Labagnara  defines herself as a 'memory keeper' carrying a camera in her bag since ages.
She quotes Annie Leibovitz to describe her vision on photography:
“One doesn't stop seeing.
  One doesn't stop framing.  It doesn't turn off and turn on.” 
Roxana always is in search of what happens around her to capture and eternalize, may it be street photography or architecture photography or black and white photography or creatively edited photography as long as she can create mood and emotions.

Let's wander through her work and listen to what she reveals about her personality behind her work.
Enjoy !

 


'Share the road' 

 

 


'Father and son'


I would like to start by thanking 1x for giving me this space to share my personal story with the rest of this wonderful community. 
And special thanks to you, dear Yvette, for your hard, caring and loving work that makes this such a wonderful place for all of us.


I was born and raised in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
I lived there until 2008, when I moved to California, the place I call home now.


Since I was very young, I became the "memory keeper" among friends and family.
I always was the one carrying a camera in my bag, taking pictures of everyone and everything spending fortunes developing photos and compiling albums…


To better describe my overall photographic vision, I would like to quote Annie Leibovitz when she says "One doesn't stop seeing.  One doesn't stop framing.  It doesn't turn off and turn on".
I am always observing what happens around me, and having a camera of cellphone by the hand to make those images eternal.


True, my work is very diversified and I can only think that this is because I never really was  interested in specializing only in one type of photography.
To me, diversifying my work is a way of growing as a photographer.
And it just happens naturally that I feel attracted to different kinds of images: Street photography is one of my favourites, but I also enjoy abstracts with textures and patterns, architecture, double exposure, black and white, creative edit.

 


'Noisy stranger'

 


'Manhattan way'

 

 


'Colombo'

 

 


'Solitude'


Sometimes inspiration shows up while watching something as it is, and you go for it.
Some other times, it comes from scenarios you had in mind and you wanted to create. In this case, I use my own images and then while editing I combine them to create a story that I want to share.
The final result might or might not be what I expected, and not suitable to pass through curation.
Nevertheless, I always have a great time during processing and whatever the result is, remains.

 


'Balconies on Wilshire Boulevard'

 

 


'Facing fears'

 

 


'lotus'

 

In all of my images, the mood, the story behind the image is way more important to me than the technical perfection.  Don' t get me wrong:  you need to know what you are doing, you need technical knowledge and I deeply respect photographers that spend hours talking about gear, lenses, filters, tripods.  I just don't feel the same way.  I prefer mood above technical perfection.

 


'Woods'

 

 


'The Blue City'

 

I'm never preparing carefully the locations where I'm intending to take photographs. Usually I just observe what is happening around me having my camera or only my cellphone ready to use.  Happily, I am lucky enough to travel a few times a year and that is also a very valuable source of inspiration.

 


'Daily scene in Centro Habana'

 

 


'Kashi'

 

I am using a Canon EOS 5D Mark III but also a Nikon Coolpix from time to time. When I don't have my cameras with me, i-Phone – you all know the saying “The best camera is the one you have with you".
I have two different tripods that I alternate, and a few very roomy and comfortable backpacks to carry everything and keep it organized.

I use some wonderful tools in Photoshop as well as in Topaz and Luminar.  
I am not an expert in editing so I can enjoy a lot playing and exploring different things within each of these programs.

Regarding my “work flow”, I see photography as my "safe and healthy" space.
The time I spend taking photographs, or working on them during processing, is the time I am really 'imbibed: here and now, feeling that everything else could and should wait.  I am totally "in the photographic zone" and it feels great.

 

What would I say to a beginner in photography?
Try to learn from the ones you admire.
Value the critiques when they come from a respectful and caring place. Don't rely too much on other's opinions: Art is very subjective and we all like different things.

 

I have many photographers I admire and from who I learned a lot.
Every time I look at Dorothea Lange's "Migrant mother" I feel the same emotion and admiration.

 


'Migrant mother' by Dorothe Lange

 

Vivian Maier is one of my favourites as well as Cartier Bresson, Sebastiao Salgado, Steve Mc Curry and many more talented artists… the list would go really long!

 
According to my own work, I really don' t have a favourite photograph which I could mark as "the one".  But some of my images including dogs are among my favourites.

 


'Nap time'

 

 


'Clotilde and Pancha'

 

 


'Centro Habana'

 

To end this interview, I would like to say that one of the things I value the most as a 1x member is the exceptional quality of the published images.
Being a member since 2013, , and having so many talented artists around on a daily basis showing their wonderful works, is the perfect platform to grow.

 

 
Write
I really liked the images you created and your story, Roxana. You have a very diverse creativity, you are always in search, it is admiring. Congratulations on the excellent interview and many thanks to Yvette for the opportunity to get to know such a wonderful author.
Thank you so much for your time and your kind comment Vladimir!
Thank a lot for your appreciation, Vladimir !
It's always interesting to learn something about the person behind the camera, and this is no exception. Your unconventional approach to photographing and discovering the motifs can be seen very clearly when looking closely at your photos, you have found your style! Many thanks also to Yvette, who made this interview possible.
Thank you for your kind feedback and support, I really appreciate it Rolf.
It's a honour to me to find the artists of our community, to interview them, Rolf ;-) Thanks for your appreciation, my friend.
Many congratulations Roxana, a well deserved honor! Thanks Yvette!
Thank you so much for taking the time to read the interview dear Francesco!
Thanks for your appreciation, Francesco!
Dear Roxana, thanks for sharing your insights as a photographer, I can find myself in your story. Your gallery is incredibly beautiful, very poetic, and human. I love your ability to have such varied galley where all photos carrying your very personal and touching signature. My compliments on this great interview. As always, my gratitude to Yvette for making it so good.
Thank you so much dear Arnon, I really appreciate your support and kindness very much.
Thanks, Arnon ... Main reason is - of course - the artists themselves. It's a matter of honour to me to present them in the most beautiful way on the magazine. They deserve it all !
Complimenti.
Grazie Massimo!
...and interesting interview, Yvette
Thank you, dear Miro!
Beautiful photo gallery, accept my congratulations Roxana.
Thank you so much Miro!
Dear Yvette, thank you so much for this interview. I am very grateful to you and 1X for offering me this space to share my work and interact with so many talented artists. It's a great honor.
My pleasure, dear Roxana! It was great to interview you and to learn so much more about you. Cheers, Yvette
Art can help alleviate mental distress

Published by Yvette Depaepe
Text and images by Matej Peljhan
Published the 15th of January 2021

 

 

I am Matej Peljhan, a Slovenian photographer.
By profession I am a clinical psychologist, therefore I can monitor the changes and consequences that occur in the mental and social life of people during a pandemic very closely.

 

 

 

 

The covid-19 pandemic began as a health crisis but spread just as rapidly as an economic, political, and social crisis of global proportions. On a daily basis, we can observe the decline in statistical indicators that point to social well-being but we are less aware of the stories of individuals and their psychological distress living behind four walls.

The closure of social life and restrictive measures play an important role in controlling the spread of the virus, but on the other hand they burden people and negatively affect their mental health. Restricted movement, social isolation, fear of infection, concerns about material security, work at home, loneliness, limited opportunities for sports and cultural activities are stressful for every individual.

In addition to the elderly, children and adolescents are particularly burdened here, having to suddenly and unpreparedly face distance learning, loss of peer contact, lack of personal space and other frustrations.

 

 

 

 

 


'Distance Learning'

 


'A Day in Isolation'

 




 

 

 


 
The rapid development of events not only dictates a demand for the activation of all scientific potentials, but also calls for a response of art. At this time art can help alleviate personal mental distress , but it can also help to raise awareness of the seriousness of social conditions and to take active social action.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I try to offer professional help to individuals as much as I can and I also remain active as an artist. I try to present the various problems, issues and dilemmas that people face through the photographic medium. I am not not using documentary photography, but rather staying at home and with the help of the props I have on hand and family members helping me as models, I create images that speak for themselves. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Write
I read this article with great interest. What you talk about and do is relevant in our time. It is very good that you can help people in such difficult moments of their lives. Thank you for such necessary work and your creativity, and special thanks to Yvette
I really liked your personal point of view and your particular type of photography dear Matej Peljhan,Especially the correct use of tools and media are signs of your vision maturity,Thank you and I wish you all the best my friend and you dear Yvette To publish these works.
wonderful collection concrats to all authors!
I read this article with great interest and I really appreciated these excellent images which, as you also said, speak for themselves. I think we all need to be encouraged and to look to the future with caution but also with a lot of hope... Thanks Matej for your great contribution and thanks also to Yvette.
Good article and creative solutions, both visual and mental Matej!
Thanks a lot for your fine contribution to the magazine, Matej! Respect for the great job you're doing and for remaining the artist you are to help alleviate mental distress in these hard times. Cheers, Yvette
Beautiful photo gallery, accept my congratulations Roxana.
Thank you so much Miro!
Dear Yvette, thank you so much for this interview. I am very grateful to you and 1X for offering me this space to share my work and interact with so many talented artists. It's a great honor.
My pleasure, dear Roxana! It was great to interview you and to learn so much more about you. Cheers, Yvette
Starless

by El Filósofo
Published the 14th of January 2021


The spring of 2013 was particularly wet in the community of Madrid. That's why the dandelion, abundant in the national park of the Sierra de Guadarrama, was especially large this year. And that's why I spent many days out in the rain with my macro lens.

 
Canon 400D  .  Canon 100mm macro f/2.8  .  f/7.1


This particular image was taken on a rainy afternoon. The rain had stopped for a few minutes and the sun slightly peeked through the clouds, so in that moment I had good light. I made several shots with different focus and depth of field. It was windy and the seed heads were moving, so it was hard to use focus stacking. I even had to lower the shutter speed in order to use a smaller aperture and increase the depth of field so that I could get enough detail in the seeds heads. Finally I was able to attempt focus stacking, working as quickly as possible during a moment when there was no wind. This image was made with four shots that were later stacked in post-processing.


"An image portraying this type of abstraction has to be well made with a main focus point, as we see in the foreground seed head on the right."

For me the result was quite satisfactory. An image portraying this type of abstraction has to be well made with a main focus point, as we see in the foreground seed head on the right. The series of lines with sharp droplets radiate from the center and reveal an entire universe on a macro level.


POST PROCESSING
I made some basic adjustments in Adobe Camera Raw, and then I exported the four images to Photoshop to merge them and make the final adjustments.

1) I opened the four photos in Camera Raw and edited them very slightly to give some sharpness and contrast.

2) Then I exported the four pictures in Photoshop and went to File > Automate > Photomerge (Figure 1). When the first stack was done, I selected all generated layers and went to Edit/Auto-Blend Layers (Figure 2), checking the stack images (Figure 3).

 

Figure 1.
 
 
 
 
Figure 2.

 

Figure 3.


3) The image was almost as I wanted it. I cropped a bit since I intentionally included more in the frame than I needed when I was shooting, just in case the seed head moved and I did not get it exactly where I wanted it in the picture.


Figure 4.


4) I also changed Color Balance to Cyan 11, Magenta 10 and Yellow 7.


Figure 5.


5) I then used Brightness/Contrast, setting Contrast to +32 to increase the contrast in the image.


Figure 6
6) Finally, I sharpened the image with the Unsharp Mask filter, Amount set to +42.
 
 
TIPS
Taking photos like this one can be a bit tricky. In a session of a few hours, I can shoot a hundred photos that may contain one or two acceptable images. The result depends on many factors:

1) There should be raindrops on the seed heads, but not too much so that the flowers are completely soaked.

2) If you want to shoot using focus stacking, there can be no wind.

3) Choose young plants that are in full bloom and not yet damaged in any way. Otherwise the symmetry will be lost.

4) Try to have blurred flowers in the background. They produce very attractive tones and will be a great supporting element in your image.

5) Since you are very close to the subject and have to be almost on top of the dandelion, there will be a loss of light. So you have to use a large aperture. You must also use a fast shutter speed in case there is wind or other movement. The dandelion has a very long stem that easily sways in even the tiniest bit of wind. Of course, a large aperture means less depth of field, so if you want a lot of detail in the image you need to use focus stacking — a technique I use only as a last resort. To get a large depth of field, the aperture has to be small and the shutter speed slow. That means that the plant must be absolutely still.
 
 
BIOGRAPHY
I was born in Madrid, Spain, in 1962. I am professor of philosophy. I was previously dedicated to painting and had several local exhibitions, which influenced my work when I took up nature photography as a hobby. I believe that it is not necessary to go to remote locations when shooting nature photography. You can find all sorts of subjects near your home or even in your own backyard. In my case, I am fortunate to live 6 miles (10 km) from the Sierra de Guadarrama National Park.
 
Write
I read this article with great interest. What you talk about and do is relevant in our time. It is very good that you can help people in such difficult moments of their lives. Thank you for such necessary work and your creativity, and special thanks to Yvette
I really liked your personal point of view and your particular type of photography dear Matej Peljhan,Especially the correct use of tools and media are signs of your vision maturity,Thank you and I wish you all the best my friend and you dear Yvette To publish these works.
wonderful collection concrats to all authors!
I read this article with great interest and I really appreciated these excellent images which, as you also said, speak for themselves. I think we all need to be encouraged and to look to the future with caution but also with a lot of hope... Thanks Matej for your great contribution and thanks also to Yvette.
Good article and creative solutions, both visual and mental Matej!
Thanks a lot for your fine contribution to the magazine, Matej! Respect for the great job you're doing and for remaining the artist you are to help alleviate mental distress in these hard times. Cheers, Yvette
Beautiful photo gallery, accept my congratulations Roxana.
Thank you so much Miro!
Dear Yvette, thank you so much for this interview. I am very grateful to you and 1X for offering me this space to share my work and interact with so many talented artists. It's a great honor.
My pleasure, dear Roxana! It was great to interview you and to learn so much more about you. Cheers, Yvette
Alps : Heroes of the Landscape

by Editor Miro Susta
Published the 13th of January 2021


The Alps are beautiful mountains, there is something for everyone, whether for climbing, hiking, enjoying natural landscapes or just simply taking photographs.

 


'Lightnings' by Peter Svoboda, MQEP

 

This article shares photographs from some beautiful alpine landscapes featured in the 1 x gallery.  It is also an invitation to explore the Alps and appreciate their beauty.
The Alps (Celtic "
alb" = high, "alpa" = mountains) are the highest and most extensive mountain range system that lies entirely in Europe, covering an area around 200’000 km2.

 


'Change of seasons' by ChrisKaddas

 

The total Alpine mountain range stretches approximately 1’200 km across eight countries: France, Monaco, Italy, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, and Slovenia, from Mediterranean Sea to the Carpathian Basin and it is bordered by the Rhone Valley, the Swiss Plateau, the upper reaches of the Danube river, the Little Hungarian Plain, the Po Valley and the Gulf of Genoa.
It forms the habitat of 13 million people and enjoys European significance as an important recreational area.
For many years, the Alpine region formed a significant barrier to travel and communication between northern and southern Europe. To this day, the Alpine valleys and passes are important trans-European transport link.



'Tremola San Gottardo' by Miro Susta

 

The Alpine Range joins the Apennines, encompasses the Po Valley, branches out to the French and Swiss Jura, and ends in a fan shaped pattern in the east in front of the West Pannonian mountains and hills.

In the northeast at the Danube river near Vienna, the Alps are separated from the geologically related Carpathians by the Vienna Basin, and in the southeast they merge into the heavily karstic Dinaric Mountains. In the north, the Alps gradually descend to the Austrian and German Alpine foothills. In the south, the drop is steeper to the Po Valley.

 


n/t by Tomasz Rojek

 

The summit heights in the western mountain ranges are mostly between 3’000 and 4’300 meters above sea level, in the eastern Alps the mountains are somewhat lower.

The highest peak in the Alps is Mont Blanc at 4,810 meters. One hundred and twenty-eight peaks in the Alps are four-thousanders, many of them covered by glaciers.

 


'Peak Of Europe' by Robert Marich

The Alps form an important climate and water divide in the "heart of Europe". They separate the central Mediterranean region with its Etesic (Mediterranean) climate from the Atlantic climate of northern Central Europe and they are under continental influence at the eastern edge as well. The drainage follows these main directions to the Mediterranean, North and Black Sea.

The Alps stand at the crossroads of the French, Italian, German and South Slavic linguistic area. Because of the complex historical background of the Alpine region, the native language of the population does not always correspond to the current international borders.

 


FRENCH  ALPS
French Alps are situated in two distinct regions: Rhône-Alpes and Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur in the south-eastern corner of France, bordering Italy and Switzerland.

High icy mountains and huge rock formations, lakes or breath-taking gorges are typical of this part of the well-known European mountain range.

 


'Lac Blanc Panorama' by Mircea Costina

 

The French Alps are divided into the Savoy Alps, where the highest massif of the Mont Blanc Alps (4’807 m) is also located, a separate Vanoise massif, the Dauphiné Alps, the Cottian Alps and the Maritime Alps with the Mercantour Massif.

 


'Highway to Heaven' by Szczepan Podolec

 

French Alps are known for their great diversity in terms of fauna and flora. They are home to more than 5’000 species of plants and more than 12’000 species of wildlife live there.
In addition, they offer beautiful and unique places that are worth seeing and experiencing.

 


'Autumn in the Alps' by Alfredo Costanzo

 

 

ITALIAN  ALPS
The Italian Alps are divided into three parts, the southern, eastern and the western part.
Dolomites belong to the finest part of the Italian Alps. They are part of the Southern Alps and spread over the regions of Veneto and Trentino-Alto Adige. 

 


n/t by David Martin Castan

 

Since 2009 selected part of Dolomites is included in the UNESCO World Natural Heritage Dolomites.
The highest peak in the Dolomites is the Marmolata at 3’343 meters. Other well-known peaks or massifs are the Civetta, the Monte Paterno, the Antelao, the Three Peaks, the Sella, the Catinaccio, the Sciliar, the Geisler and the Sassolungo.

 


'Monte Paterno' by Marco Calandra

 

The Italian part of the Julian Alps is known for the Jôf di Montasio (2’753 m), and Brent with the 3’173 m high Cima Tossa summit, belongs to the eastern Italian Alps.

 


'Autumn in Dolomites' by Ales Krivec


The western section includes one part of the Valais Alps with the giant Dufourspitze, which is 4’634 meters high. Among others, here can be found the Grajer Alps with the summit of Gran Paradiso – 4’061 meters.

 


'Where the sky ends' byVito Guarino

 

SWISS  ALPS
Swiss Alps cover more than three-fifths of the national territory of the Helvetic Confederation and, in their entirety, belong mostly to the Western Alps, which spread out mainly from the southwest to the northeast.
The northern part of the Swiss Alps consists of Bernese Alps, and in the west of Glarus Alps.

 


'Alpine Glacier' by Miro Susta

 

The southern part is taken up by Valais Alps, Ticino Alps and Grisons Alps.
The Gotthard massif, through which the longest railroad tunnel in the world passes, is considered the centre of the Swiss Alps.

 


'Morning glow' by RetoSavoca

 

The Matterhorn (4’478 m) and the Eiger (3’967m) are probably the best-known mountain peaks in the Swiss Alps, but they are not the highest.

 


'The first touch' by Krzystof Mierzejewsky

 

The highest fixed point in Switzerland is 4’634m above sea level on the Dufourspitze (on the border with Italy), which is also the highest peak in the Valais Alps.
Since the Swiss Alps are dominated by many glaciers, which naturally provide a large amount of water, there are also two major European rivers that have their source in Switzerland.

 


'Aletschgletcher' by Tomas Sereda

 

The Rhine, one of the longest rivers in Europe, and the Rhone, both, originate in the Grisons Alps, but the Rhine flows into the cold North Sea and the Rhone into the rather warm Mediterranean Sea.

 


'Corno Gries, Switzerland' by Vito Guarino



Switzerland has many Alpine road and railway bridges and tunnels. The most notable tunnels are the Gotthard Road Tunnel (16.9 km long) and the Gotthard Base Rail Tunnel (57.1 km long). The most famous bridge is the World-Heritage-listed Albula Railway Landwasser Viaduct, which is 65 metres high, 136 metres long.

 


'Ghost Rider' by Andreas Agazzi

 



GERMAN  ALPS
Germany shares a small region of the Alps, entirely located in Southern Bavaria.

 


'Bavarian heartland' by Dag Ole Nordhaug

 

The German-Bavarian Alps belong to a range of the Northern Eastern Alps. The western end is formed by the Allgäu Alps, the eastern end by the Berchtesgaden Alps.

 


'Rainy morning at Hintersee' by Dirk Wiemer

 

Zugspitze is the highest peak at 2’962 meters located in the Wetterstein Mountains, it overlooks Garmisch-Partenkirchen and offers a fantastic view of more than 400 Alpine peaks.

 


'October Days' by Norbert Maier

 
About half of the area of the Bavarian Alps is covered by forests.

 


'The Two  Castles' by Andreas Wonisch

 

AUSTRIAN  ALPS
The Austrian part of the Alps, which covers about two thirds of the Austrian territory, includes most of the Eastern Alps, the Carnic Alps, the Southern Karavanke and northern parts of the Southern Alps.

 

 
'Tourist view' by Juan Pablo de Miguel

 

The Austrian Eastern Alps are divided into the Northern Alps and the Central Alps, whose border is given by the line from western Klostertal- Arlberg to the southern Vienna Basin in the east.
The Großglockner (3’797 m), Austria's highest mountain, and the 20 km2 Pasterzen glacier are in the Hohe Tauern.

 


'New day is born' by Zdechlypes

 
In addition, there are nearly 1000 glaciers and about 860 "three-thousanders" in the Austrian Alps.

 


'Freeride' by Marcel Rebro

 
The Austrian Alps form an important climate and water divide for the country. The western and northern rim is characterized more by the Atlantic climate with rich precipitation from westerly winds, the eastern part by the dry Pannonian inland climate from Hungary and the southern slope by the mild Mediterranean climate.

 


'Snowstorm in the Alps' by KrystynaAnnaMaria

 

 

SLOVENIAN  ALPS
The Slovenian Alps are the most remarkable mountain group in Slovenia, stretching in the north of the country.

 

 
'Out of the blue' by Matjaz Cater


On a relatively small area there are 210 peaks exceeding the height of 2’000 m, 24 of them are higher than 2’500 m. The highest peak in the Slovenian Alps is Triglav - 2‘864 m, which is also the highest point in Slovenia.

 


'Silent Moment before descent' by Sandi Bertonelj

 

GLORY TO THE BEAUTY
From the 18th century onwards, the Alpine region attracted attention in the context of a growing admiration for nature.

 


'Slovenian autumn...' by Krzysztof Browko

 

The Alps were described as "an extraordinary mountain country."

Considering the Alpine landscape and the photographs that are featured in this article, one can certainly agree with that.

 


'Winter evening in the mountains' by Ralf Eisenhut

 

However, the reason for that are not only the striking landscapes of this mountainous region, but also its exceptional location in the middle of densely populated European countries.

We are living in an amazing world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. The Alpine region is a part of it and I am sure that we will continue enjoying and discovering it after defeating our current strong enemy, the COVID-19.

Just stay healthy and strong, be patient and keep your camera ready.

 

www.mrsphoto.net

photo@mrsphoto.net

 

 

Write
Wonderful images, thank you very much !!!
Glad to see that you like it Thierry. Many thanks for your appreciation.
Wonderful article, Miro and Yvette!, I enjoyed it reading and admiring the beautiful photographs. Thank you.
Many thanks for your nice comments Francisco, we appreciate it very much.
Beautiful presentation Miro and Yvette. Thank you so much for sharing two of my image in this splendid collection.
Many thanks for nice words of appreciation, and thank you for your beautiful photos.
A beautiful series brought together, thank you very much Yvette and Miro for this lovely work!
Many thanks for your nice appreciation Andreas.
Wonderful presentation, Thank You...
Most welcome Vladimir.
Thank you guys . I´m very happy to be in this big selecction ;)
Welcome David. Thank you for your excellent photo contribution.
Thank you Yette. I´m very happy to be in this selecction ;)
Dear Yvette, thank you so much for this interview. I am very grateful to you and 1X for offering me this space to share my work and interact with so many talented artists. It's a great honor.
My pleasure, dear Roxana! It was great to interview you and to learn so much more about you. Cheers, Yvette